One Finite Planet

Population and Overpopulation

Population is a complex area. To arrive at my current point of understanding, it took me a number of light bulb moments over the years since 2013, with many realisations shattering some of my previous beliefs, and sometimes taking years to be ready to take the next step.

Here is a recap of my journey, and if you can move quickly from step to step, then you can absorb information faster than I can, but perhaps this information will inspire others on their own journey.

Reference

The surprising thing is, people throughout history, and before, lived longer than is often depicted.

From the 1500s till around 1800, life expectancy throughout Europe hovered between 30 and 40 years of age, then the 20th century, life expectancy rose from 49.2 to 80.3 years.

The surprise is, throughout history and as long as far back as we can know, a full lifespan has always been around 70 years or longer. The biggest change has not the length of a human lifespan, but instead, the dramatic increase in percentage of people who get to enjoy that lifespan.

For the environment, our peak population will be a nightmare. This page explores alternatives for the future of population, and the possibility that the current peak population will be the last time there are ever this many humans on Earth.

When you look around, it is clear all other complex organisms on Earth have, and can maintain, an 'optimum population' level for their environment, yet there is a common perception that humanity is an exception, and seem to experience continual population growth.

This is an exploration of how optimum populations are reached, and critically are maintained naturally without overpopulation, and the implications for humanity.

Timeline
Topics and Subtopics.
All: Population and Overpopulation

The surprising reality of increased human life expectancy.

The surprising thing is, people throughout history, and before, lived longer than is often depicted.

From the 1500s till around 1800, life expectancy throughout Europe hovered between 30 and 40 years of age, then the 20th century, life expectancy rose from 49.2 to 80.3 years.

The surprise is, throughout history and as long as far back as we can know, a full lifespan has always been around 70 years or longer. The biggest change has not the length of a human lifespan, but instead, the dramatic increase in percentage of people who get to enjoy that lifespan.

Read More »

Peak Population: We May Never Return.

For the environment, our peak population will be a nightmare. This page explores alternatives for the future of population, and the possibility that the current peak population will be the last time there are ever this many humans on Earth.

Read More »

Optimum Population: The Answer To The Population Puzzle?

When you look around, it is clear all other complex organisms on Earth have, and can maintain, an ‘optimum population’ level for their environment, yet there is a common perception that humanity is an exception, and seem to experience continual population growth.

This is an exploration of how optimum populations are reached, and critically are maintained naturally without overpopulation, and the implications for humanity.

Read More »

My Journey To Understanding Population.

Population is a complex area. To arrive at my current point of understanding, it took me a number of light bulb moments over the years since 2013, with many realisations shattering some of my previous beliefs, and sometimes taking years to be ready to take the next step.

Here is a recap of my journey, and if you can move quickly from step to step, then you can absorb information faster than I can, but perhaps this information will inspire others on their own journey.

Read More »

Population Explosion: What happened to get to 8 Billion people?

Humanity has just experienced a population explosion. Whether you believe we are overpopulated or not, the facts are that we have had a population explosion. A period of population growth that peaked at rate over 100x accelerated above the average over human history. Why? Not because of more food, the industrial revolution, or improved farming or access to fossil fuel, but due to modern medicine.

Read More »